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Current funders: Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, MS Society, Moulton Charitable Trust, Freemason’s Grand Charity. Clinical investigation of patients treated using alemtuzumab Orla Tuohy, Grant Cawthorne-Hill, Tom Button, with Michael Fahey [Australia] and David Miller [UCL] We continue to follow up all patients treated using alemtuzumab, since 1991. We have recently published the follow-up of the people with progressive multiple sclerosis treated between 1991 and 1998. We are now writing up the long-term follow-up of our relapsing-remitting cohort, treated since 1999. We have just published a small study of MTR MRI imaging on people after alemtuzumab, showing recovery of MTR signal. We have started a trial of a licensed drug (human KGF) to prevent autoimmunity after alemtuzumab. More information here.

Immunological studies of alemtuzumab

Joanne Jones, Sara Thompson We are trying to answer three questions: Why do people get autoimmunnity after alemtuzumab? Following on from Amanda Cox and Sara Thompson’s previous work, we have shown that the reconstitution of T lymphocytes occurs by expansion of peripheral T cells with reduced thymmic output. Can we predict who is at risk of autoimmunity after alemtuzumab? Following Jo Jones’ initial description of the role of IL-21 in autoimmunity after alemtuzumab we are now refining this into a potential predictive biomarker for autoimmunity.

Reducing the immunogenicity of alemtuzumab

Alasdair Coles, Jen Sommerfield with Herman Waldmann & Geoff Hale People treated with alemtuzumab can develop antibodies to the drug which, rarely, can neutralise the efficacy of subsequent treatments. Following seminal work in Herman Waldmann’s lab, we performed a trial of pretreating patients with a variant of alemtuzumab designed to induce long-lasting tolerance to regular alemttuzumab.
YOUR HEADING TEXT Alasdair Coles, Joanne Jones and Alastair Compston  Cambridge Neuroimmunology

Alemtuzumab Research